Deniz Bevan

Author. Editing. Sleep? What's that?

menor-maimbite:

I know i blog a  lot of The Stand, but this is one comic adaptation of a book that i am blown away by.

Ooh, I’d like to read this!

(via menor-maimbite-deactivated20140)

amandapalmer:

CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE RUCKUS, SIR?

I think I’ll be tumblring some more Molly Ringwald for my birthday month…

amandapalmer:

CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE RUCKUS, SIR?

I think I’ll be tumblring some more Molly Ringwald for my birthday month…

(Source: marimarsgiffolder)

neil-gaiman:

abigaillarson:

Well. It’s almost Halloween, so I thought I’d take a break from work to make a festive public service announcement from Neil Gaiman.
I don’t have nearly as many fabulous escapades in graveyards as I once did, unfortunately, but this was a fun way to remember those days.

This is glorious!

You have until Thursday!

neil-gaiman:

abigaillarson:

Well. It’s almost Halloween, so I thought I’d take a break from work to make a festive public service announcement from Neil Gaiman.

I don’t have nearly as many fabulous escapades in graveyards as I once did, unfortunately, but this was a fun way to remember those days.

This is glorious!

You have until Thursday!

rivervox said: I noticed that you use "dwarfs" in the US version of "Fortunately, the Milk" and wondered if that is your preferred spelling, or if the copy editors chose it. We enjoyed the book greatly, especially the wumpires.

neil-gaiman:

It’s the plural of dwarf.

Tolkien made up the word dwarves, to show that he was referring to a race of people. (http://grammarist.com/usage/dwarfs-dwarves/ ) Other people have used it since, most of them probably assuming that it was the true plural. (And Sondheim plays with dwarfs/dwarves in his song Agony, which you can watch at http://youtu.be/UAPJTik5mSo)

And for the etymologically interested: via http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=dwarf

dwarf (n.) Look up dwarf at Dictionary.comOld English dweorhdweorg (West Saxon), duerg (Mercian), “very short human being,” from Proto-Germanic *dweraz (cf. Old Frisian dwerch, Old Saxon dwerg, Old High German twerg, German Zwerg, Old Norse dvergr), perhaps from PIE *dhwergwhos ”something tiny,” but with no established cognates outside Germanic. The mythological sense is 1770, from German (it seems never to have developed independently in English).

Whilst in this and other ways the dwarfs do at times have dealings with mankind, yet on the whole they seem to shrink from man; they give the impression of a downtrodden afflicted race, which is on the point of abandoning its ancient home to new and more powerful invaders. There is stamped on their character something shy and somethingheathenish, which estranges them from intercourse with christians. They chafe at human faithlessness, which no doubt would primarily mean the apostacy from heathenism. In the poems of the Mid. Ages, Laurin is expressly set before us as a heathen. It goes sorely against the dwarfs to see churches built, bell-ringing … disturbs their ancient privacy; they also hate the clearing of forests, agriculture, new fangled pounding-machinery for ore. [“Teutonic Mythology,” Jacob Grimm, transl. Stallybrass, 1883]

The shift of the Old English guttural at the end of the word to modern -f is typical (cf. enoughdraft). Old English plural dweorgas became Middle English dwarrows, later leveled down todwarfs. The use of dwarves for the legendary race was popularized by J.R.R. Tolkien. As an adjective, from 1590s.

Tolkien always said it should properly have been dwarrows, if languages evolved logically. He used that in the place name Dwarrowdelf.

amandapalmer:

katiehassomebigasstitties:

A very sleepy Amanda Palmer

now that’s a photo you rarely see.

Aww, I’m not the only one that sleeps like this

amandapalmer:

katiehassomebigasstitties:

A very sleepy Amanda Palmer

now that’s a photo you rarely see.

Aww, I’m not the only one that sleeps like this

(Source: celebrationgeneration.com)

strangepawers:

Two Characters In Search Of A Country Song
(NB: For legal purposes I should probably point out that Johnny Cash never had a relationship with a kitten, even if this one is absolutely adorable). 

Here’s another. I’m thinking I’ll have to do one of my own. All The Umbrellas in London, maybe…

strangepawers:

Two Characters In Search Of A Country Song

(NB: For legal purposes I should probably point out that Johnny Cash never had a relationship with a kitten, even if this one is absolutely adorable). 

Here’s another. I’m thinking I’ll have to do one of my own. All The Umbrellas in London, maybe…

(Source: twentytwowords.com)

neil-gaiman:

strangepawers:

Papa was a Rodeo
After a long time on the road* we’re back!
*doing boring responsible adult things

It really is a Tumblr of photographs of cats illustrating lines from Magnetic Fields Lyrics.  THIS IS WHAT THE INTERNETS WAS INVENTED FOR, dammit.

THIS
YES, THIS

neil-gaiman:

strangepawers:

Papa was a Rodeo

After a long time on the road* we’re back!

*doing boring responsible adult things

It really is a Tumblr of photographs of cats illustrating lines from Magnetic Fields Lyrics.  THIS IS WHAT THE INTERNETS WAS INVENTED FOR, dammit.

THIS

YES, THIS

odditiesoflife:

Incredible Miniature Animals Carved on Pencil Tips

Loving everything tiny, Seattle based artist Diem Chau has created her most recent project. Miniature animals carved in the wood and graphite of carpenter pencils. Carefully shaving the wood from the pencil to expose the inner graphite, she pain-painstakingly carved miniature animals with amazing results.

source

Awesome

(via amandapalmer)

Neil Gaiman: On Escapism: Rebloggable by request.

neil-gaiman:

Quick question, do you think that writing/reading fantasy books can be a form of escapism for people who generally feel bad about their lives or bad about themselves in general?

I don’t, although that would be pretty cool. 

I think they’re even better than that. 

I think that  pretty much every form of fiction (I’d include fantasy, obviously) can actually be a real escape from places where you feel bad, and from bad places. It can be a safe place you go, like going on holiday, and it can be somewhere that, while you’ve escaped, actually teaches you things you need to know when you go back, that gives you knowledge and armour and tools to change the bad place you were in.

So no, they’re not escapist. They’re escape.”

neil-gaiman:

I don’t live nearby. But this was in the (London) Times this morning…
View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay 

…added to list of places to visit next time I’m in the UK…

neil-gaiman:

I don’t live nearby. But this was in the (London) Times this morning…

View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay

…added to list of places to visit next time I’m in the UK…

St Jerome In His Study, by Messina and Dürer, respectively.

erikkwakkel:

The ultimate book gadget
This may just be the most profound book gadget in history. The image from 1588 shows the book wheel invented by the Renaissance engineer Agostino Ramelli. The idea was to give a scholar the opportunity to consult several books at the same time, each remaining open at the page that was consulted last. The version in the image contains about twelve books, all well balanced as the giant wheel turned. In the age of small desks, this device was a revelation. It encouraged people to craft studies in the modern sense of the word, using a variety of sources that were discussed simultaneously in a scholarly treatise. I have sat behind a smaller version surviving from the 17th century (placed in a 17th-century library) and it is quite an overwhelming experience to see all those books spin before your eyes. Knowledge overload.
Pic: The Diverse and Artifactitious Machines of Captain Agostino Ramelli, a book of engineering designs from 1588.

I could use one of these!

erikkwakkel:

The ultimate book gadget

This may just be the most profound book gadget in history. The image from 1588 shows the book wheel invented by the Renaissance engineer Agostino Ramelli. The idea was to give a scholar the opportunity to consult several books at the same time, each remaining open at the page that was consulted last. The version in the image contains about twelve books, all well balanced as the giant wheel turned. In the age of small desks, this device was a revelation. It encouraged people to craft studies in the modern sense of the word, using a variety of sources that were discussed simultaneously in a scholarly treatise. I have sat behind a smaller version surviving from the 17th century (placed in a 17th-century library) and it is quite an overwhelming experience to see all those books spin before your eyes. Knowledge overload.

Pic: The Diverse and Artifactitious Machines of Captain Agostino Ramelli, a book of engineering designs from 1588.

I could use one of these!

The Sketchbook

Gorgeous sketches and paintings!

neil-gaiman:

joehillsthrills:

The big takeaway from this Sunday’s New York Times Magazine article? McMurtry is now the most famous Welsh Corgi in America.
At least in the early going, celebrity hasn’t changed the typically easy-going pup.
"I still put my pants on one leg at a time," he said, when reached for a comment earlier this morning. “That’s a joke!" he added. “I don’t wear pants."
With that he resumed chewing on his favorite squeak toy, a long fuzzy green tube that looks vaguely like the Jolly Green Giant’s bloated phallus.
Advertisers and show business professionals looking to use McMurtry’s uniquely noble profile are advised to contact his professional representatives with Hotchkiss & Associates.

What I love best about this article are the people in the comments who have realised that actually Joe Hill is just a puppet pen-name for his dad who, frustrated by the failure of previous pen-name Richard Bachman, is secretly writing everything Joe writes. INCLUDING THIS TUMBLR.
I know. I shouldn’t read the comments. Nobody should ever read the comments. But don’t those people know that by posting the truth openly like that, they risk a visit from “Joe” and “Owen” and “McMurtry”? A very final visit…

Lovely article about family and writing and moving through life in general.

neil-gaiman:

joehillsthrills:

The big takeaway from this Sunday’s New York Times Magazine article? McMurtry is now the most famous Welsh Corgi in America.

At least in the early going, celebrity hasn’t changed the typically easy-going pup.

"I still put my pants on one leg at a time," he said, when reached for a comment earlier this morning. “That’s a joke!" he added. “I don’t wear pants."

With that he resumed chewing on his favorite squeak toy, a long fuzzy green tube that looks vaguely like the Jolly Green Giant’s bloated phallus.

Advertisers and show business professionals looking to use McMurtry’s uniquely noble profile are advised to contact his professional representatives with Hotchkiss & Associates.

What I love best about this article are the people in the comments who have realised that actually Joe Hill is just a puppet pen-name for his dad who, frustrated by the failure of previous pen-name Richard Bachman, is secretly writing everything Joe writes. INCLUDING THIS TUMBLR.

I know. I shouldn’t read the comments. Nobody should ever read the comments. But don’t those people know that by posting the truth openly like that, they risk a visit from “Joe” and “Owen” and “McMurtry”? A very final visit…

Lovely article about family and writing and moving through life in general.

rm322:

Ocean At The End Of The Lane (Deluxe Signed Edition) - Neil Gaiman - Illustrated by Dave McKean

I wish I could draw pails like that.
And that dedication page is absolutely gorgeous.
Oh yea, I love the book too

(via neil-gaiman)